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Browsing Animations: summer-physics

77 Animations


Animate

040301.iwp

A cannonball is launched horizontally from a cannon on a cliff. What must the initial velocity be for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040302.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level at 45 degrees. What must the magnitude of the initial velocity be in order for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040303.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any target position, what values can the launch angle have in order for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040302.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level at 45 degrees. What must the magnitude of the initial velocity be in order for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040303.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any target position, what values can the launch angle have in order for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040304.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any particular launch angle, how can you calculate the maximum height of the ball, the time to reach that height, and the maximum range of the ball?

Animate

040303.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any target position, what values can the launch angle have in order for the ball to hit the target?

Animate

040304.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any particular launch angle, how can you calculate the maximum height of the ball, the time to reach that height, and the maximum range of the ball?

Animate

040305.iwp

A cannonball is launched from a cannon on a cliff. What must the launch velocity be for the ball to hit the moving target? How does this depend on the launch angle?

Animate

040304.iwp

A cannonball is launched from ground level. The angle of launch can be changed. For any particular launch angle, how can you calculate the maximum height of the ball, the time to reach that height, and the maximum range of the ball?

Animate

040305.iwp

A cannonball is launched from a cannon on a cliff. What must the launch velocity be for the ball to hit the moving target? How does this depend on the launch angle?

Animate

2dforce-01a.iwp

The view is looking down on an air hockey table. A puck initially moving at constant velocity receives a momentary push in the +y direction at x = -2 as shown in each of the animations (selectable by numbers 1 to 4). Which animation correctly shows the motion of the puck after it is pushed?

Animate

040305.iwp

A cannonball is launched from a cannon on a cliff. What must the launch velocity be for the ball to hit the moving target? How does this depend on the launch angle?

Animate

2dforce-01a.iwp

The view is looking down on an air hockey table. A puck initially moving at constant velocity receives a momentary push in the +y direction at x = -2 as shown in each of the animations (selectable by numbers 1 to 4). Which animation correctly shows the motion of the puck after it is pushed?

Animate

2dforce-01b.iwp

A satellite moves at constant velocity when, at x = -2, its thrusters are suddenly engaged, producing a constant force perpendicular to its original motion. Which animation correctly depicts the satellite's motion after the thrusters are first engaged?

Animate

2dforce-01a.iwp

The view is looking down on an air hockey table. A puck initially moving at constant velocity receives a momentary push in the +y direction at x = -2 as shown in each of the animations (selectable by numbers 1 to 4). Which animation correctly shows the motion of the puck after it is pushed?

Animate

2dforce-01b.iwp

A satellite moves at constant velocity when, at x = -2, its thrusters are suddenly engaged, producing a constant force perpendicular to its original motion. Which animation correctly depicts the satellite's motion after the thrusters are first engaged?

Animate

atwoods-01.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. The pulley is supported from above. When the blocks are released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the pulley.

Animate

2dforce-01b.iwp

A satellite moves at constant velocity when, at x = -2, its thrusters are suddenly engaged, producing a constant force perpendicular to its original motion. Which animation correctly depicts the satellite's motion after the thrusters are first engaged?

Animate

atwoods-01.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. The pulley is supported from above. When the blocks are released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the pulley.

Animate

auto-impulse-3.iwp

A car and its unseatbelted crash test dummy accelerates uniformly from rest toward an immovable wall. The car bounces off the wall and then decelerates uniformly to a stop. Click Show Graph to display a graph of the velocity of the car vs. time.

Animate

atwoods-01.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. The pulley is supported from above. When the blocks are released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the pulley.

Animate

auto-impulse-3.iwp

A car and its unseatbelted crash test dummy accelerates uniformly from rest toward an immovable wall. The car bounces off the wall and then decelerates uniformly to a stop. Click Show Graph to display a graph of the velocity of the car vs. time.

Animate

auto-impulse-compare.iwp

Two cars of equal mass and initial velocity to the right collide with a wall. One car is stopped in the collision and the other bounces off the wall with a velocity of smaller magnitude than it struck the wall. Which car experiences the greater average force of impact in the collision with the wall?

Animate

auto-impulse-3.iwp

A car and its unseatbelted crash test dummy accelerates uniformly from rest toward an immovable wall. The car bounces off the wall and then decelerates uniformly to a stop. Click Show Graph to display a graph of the velocity of the car vs. time.

Animate

auto-impulse-compare.iwp

Two cars of equal mass and initial velocity to the right collide with a wall. One car is stopped in the collision and the other bounces off the wall with a velocity of smaller magnitude than it struck the wall. Which car experiences the greater average force of impact in the collision with the wall?

Animate

collision-01.iwp

Two objects collide and rebound from each other. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

auto-impulse-compare.iwp

Two cars of equal mass and initial velocity to the right collide with a wall. One car is stopped in the collision and the other bounces off the wall with a velocity of smaller magnitude than it struck the wall. Which car experiences the greater average force of impact in the collision with the wall?

Animate

collision-01.iwp

Two objects collide and rebound from each other. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-02.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-01.iwp

Two objects collide and rebound from each other. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-02.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-02b.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together.

Animate

collision-02.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-02b.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together.

Animate

collision-03.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-02b.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together.

Animate

collision-03.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-04.iwp

Two objects collide. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn relative to the magnitude of the momentum. The total kinetic energy of the system of two objects is represented by the orange bar. The coefficient of restitution may have values from 0 to 1. This parameter adjusts the degree of elasticity of the collision. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-03.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn to the same scale. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-04.iwp

Two objects collide. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn relative to the magnitude of the momentum. The total kinetic energy of the system of two objects is represented by the orange bar. The coefficient of restitution may have values from 0 to 1. This parameter adjusts the degree of elasticity of the collision. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-elastic-2b.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. The animation will stop at the beginning of the collision. If the animation were allowed to proceed, predict what the final velocities would be.

Animate

collision-04.iwp

Two objects collide. The momentum vector of each object as well as the sum of the momentum vectors is displayed. The lengths of the vectors are drawn relative to the magnitude of the momentum. The total kinetic energy of the system of two objects is represented by the orange bar. The coefficient of restitution may have values from 0 to 1. This parameter adjusts the degree of elasticity of the collision. Unphysical results may be obtained for combinations of initial velocities for which the objects cannot collide.

Animate

collision-elastic-2b.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. The animation will stop at the beginning of the collision. If the animation were allowed to proceed, predict what the final velocities would be.

Animate

collision-elastic-2d-01.iwp

A green ball makes a glancing elastic collision with an initially stationary red ball. The balls have equal mass. The paths of the balls after the collision are perpendicular. The vectors shown represent momenta.

Animate

collision-elastic-2b.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. The animation will stop at the beginning of the collision. If the animation were allowed to proceed, predict what the final velocities would be.

Animate

collision-elastic-2d-01.iwp

A green ball makes a glancing elastic collision with an initially stationary red ball. The balls have equal mass. The paths of the balls after the collision are perpendicular. The vectors shown represent momenta.

Animate

collision-elastic-3.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The x-coordinate of the center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. Click Show Graph. The velocities of the two objects and of the center of mass will be displayed as a function of time. Try collisions for different values of mass and initial velocity. After a while, you should be able to predict the final velocities, given any pair of initial velocities.

Animate

collision-elastic-2d-01.iwp

A green ball makes a glancing elastic collision with an initially stationary red ball. The balls have equal mass. The paths of the balls after the collision are perpendicular. The vectors shown represent momenta.

Animate

collision-elastic-3.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The x-coordinate of the center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. Click Show Graph. The velocities of the two objects and of the center of mass will be displayed as a function of time. Try collisions for different values of mass and initial velocity. After a while, you should be able to predict the final velocities, given any pair of initial velocities.

Animate

collision-elastic-4a.iwp

Determine the center of mass velocity for this elastic collision. Why is the center of mass velocity the same before and after the collision? Look at the velocity vs. time graphs. If you added a line for the center of mass velocity, what would it look like?

Animate

collision-elastic-3.iwp

Two gliders collide in an elastic collision. The x-coordinate of the center of mass of the system of gliders is shown as a black dot. Play the animation. Click Show Graph. The velocities of the two objects and of the center of mass will be displayed as a function of time. Try collisions for different values of mass and initial velocity. After a while, you should be able to predict the final velocities, given any pair of initial velocities.

Animate

collision-elastic-4a.iwp

Determine the center of mass velocity for this elastic collision. Why is the center of mass velocity the same before and after the collision? Look at the velocity vs. time graphs. If you added a line for the center of mass velocity, what would it look like?

Animate

collision-explosion-02.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-elastic-4a.iwp

Determine the center of mass velocity for this elastic collision. Why is the center of mass velocity the same before and after the collision? Look at the velocity vs. time graphs. If you added a line for the center of mass velocity, what would it look like?

Animate

collision-explosion-02.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-explosion-02b.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-explosion-02.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-explosion-02b.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-inelastic-06.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. Determine the ratio of the masses of the blocks.

Animate

collision-explosion-02b.iwp

Two objects are initially at rest. A spring-loaded plunger attached to the red block is quickly released, and the blocks push each other apart.

Animate

collision-inelastic-06.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. Determine the ratio of the masses of the blocks.

Animate

eforce-05.iwp

This is a multiple-choice problem. Enter each of the numbers 1 to 4 in the Choice box. Reset after entering a number. Each choice shows a different version of the electric forces on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. Which one of the choices is correct?

Animate

collision-inelastic-06.iwp

Two objects collide and stick together. Determine the ratio of the masses of the blocks.

Animate

eforce-05.iwp

This is a multiple-choice problem. Enter each of the numbers 1 to 4 in the Choice box. Reset after entering a number. Each choice shows a different version of the electric forces on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. Which one of the choices is correct?

Animate

eforce-06.iwp

If the green charge is +1.0 uc (microcoulomb), what are the magnitude and direction of the net electric force on the green charge? Note that all the charges are positive.

Animate

eforce-05.iwp

This is a multiple-choice problem. Enter each of the numbers 1 to 4 in the Choice box. Reset after entering a number. Each choice shows a different version of the electric forces on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. Which one of the choices is correct?

Animate

eforce-06.iwp

If the green charge is +1.0 uc (microcoulomb), what are the magnitude and direction of the net electric force on the green charge? Note that all the charges are positive.

Animate

eforce-07.iwp

Two charges (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. The green vector represents the net electric force on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. At what position will the net force on the green charge be 0?

Animate

eforce-06.iwp

If the green charge is +1.0 uc (microcoulomb), what are the magnitude and direction of the net electric force on the green charge? Note that all the charges are positive.

Animate

eforce-07.iwp

Two charges (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. The green vector represents the net electric force on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. At what position will the net force on the green charge be 0?

Animate

eforce-08.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. Step through the animation to see how the net electric force changes with the position of the green object.

Animate

eforce-07.iwp

Two charges (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. The green vector represents the net electric force on the positive green charge due to the red and blue charges. At what position will the net force on the green charge be 0?

Animate

eforce-08.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. Step through the animation to see how the net electric force changes with the position of the green object.

Animate

eforce-09.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. The position of the green object and magnitude of the net force on the green object are given under Outputs.

Animate

eforce-08.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. Step through the animation to see how the net electric force changes with the position of the green object.

Animate

eforce-09.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. The position of the green object and magnitude of the net force on the green object are given under Outputs.

Animate

energy-spring-1b.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center and the direction of +x is to the right. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The system is taken to be the block and spring. (Gravitational and normal forces do no work on the block.) Which one of the energy bar diagrams (A,B,C,D) represents how the kinetic energy (blue), elastic potential energy (red), and total system energy (green) change as a function of time?

Animate

eforce-09.iwp

Two charged objects (red and blue) are fixed in position on the x-axis. When the animation is started, a small green charged object is pushed back and forth between the red and blue objects. (If you want to make the hand invisible, change the Hand Visible input to 0.) The red and blue vectors represent the electric forces on the green object due to red and blue objects respectively. The green vector represents the net electric force on the green object due to the blue and red objects. The position of the green object and magnitude of the net force on the green object are given under Outputs.

Animate

energy-spring-1b.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center and the direction of +x is to the right. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The system is taken to be the block and spring. (Gravitational and normal forces do no work on the block.) Which one of the energy bar diagrams (A,B,C,D) represents how the kinetic energy (blue), elastic potential energy (red), and total system energy (green) change as a function of time?

Animate

energy-vertspring-01.iwp

A block is suspended from a fixed support by a rubber band. When held in place by the green stick, the rubber band is completely relaxed. When the green stick is pulled away, the block oscillates vertically under the action of gravity and a Hooke's Law type spring force. The red line (marked y = 0) is the position at which both gravitational and elastic potential energy are taken to be 0. The system includes the block, Earth, and band. No external forces act on the system. (Scroll down.) When you play the animation, 4 sets of blue, red, and green bars labeled A-D will appear. One of these sets represents the kinetic (blue), elastic potential (red), and gravitational potential (green) energies. Which set is the correct one? (Note the indicator of positive, 0, and negative energy shown to middle left.)

Animate

energy-spring-1b.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center and the direction of +x is to the right. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The system is taken to be the block and spring. (Gravitational and normal forces do no work on the block.) Which one of the energy bar diagrams (A,B,C,D) represents how the kinetic energy (blue), elastic potential energy (red), and total system energy (green) change as a function of time?

Animate

energy-vertspring-01.iwp

A block is suspended from a fixed support by a rubber band. When held in place by the green stick, the rubber band is completely relaxed. When the green stick is pulled away, the block oscillates vertically under the action of gravity and a Hooke's Law type spring force. The red line (marked y = 0) is the position at which both gravitational and elastic potential energy are taken to be 0. The system includes the block, Earth, and band. No external forces act on the system. (Scroll down.) When you play the animation, 4 sets of blue, red, and green bars labeled A-D will appear. One of these sets represents the kinetic (blue), elastic potential (red), and gravitational potential (green) energies. Which set is the correct one? (Note the indicator of positive, 0, and negative energy shown to middle left.)

Animate

equilibrium-01.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. What are the magnitudes and directions of the forces on the ball?

Animate

energy-vertspring-01.iwp

A block is suspended from a fixed support by a rubber band. When held in place by the green stick, the rubber band is completely relaxed. When the green stick is pulled away, the block oscillates vertically under the action of gravity and a Hooke's Law type spring force. The red line (marked y = 0) is the position at which both gravitational and elastic potential energy are taken to be 0. The system includes the block, Earth, and band. No external forces act on the system. (Scroll down.) When you play the animation, 4 sets of blue, red, and green bars labeled A-D will appear. One of these sets represents the kinetic (blue), elastic potential (red), and gravitational potential (green) energies. Which set is the correct one? (Note the indicator of positive, 0, and negative energy shown to middle left.)

Animate

equilibrium-01.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. What are the magnitudes and directions of the forces on the ball?

Animate

equilibrium-02.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different vertical positions of the ball.

Animate

equilibrium-01.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. What are the magnitudes and directions of the forces on the ball?

Animate

equilibrium-02.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different vertical positions of the ball.

Animate

equilibrium-03b.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different horizontal positions of the ball.

Animate

equilibrium-02.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different vertical positions of the ball.

Animate

equilibrium-03b.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different horizontal positions of the ball.

Animate

friction01b.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The box is in motion at t = 0. A constant force (for example, from a hand) is applied on the box to the right. The grid spacing is 1 meter. Assume the axis directions shown.

Animate

equilibrium-03b.iwp

A ball is suspended by strong wires from two posts. The tension forces and weight are shown. Step through the animation using the >> button to see how the forces change for different horizontal positions of the ball.

Animate

friction01b.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The box is in motion at t = 0. A constant force (for example, from a hand) is applied on the box to the right. The grid spacing is 1 meter. Assume the axis directions shown.

Animate

friction01c.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The forces on the box are shown. Try changing the parameters (mass of box, coefficient fo kinetic friction, applied force) to see how that affects the force vectors.

Animate

friction01b.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The box is in motion at t = 0. A constant force (for example, from a hand) is applied on the box to the right. The grid spacing is 1 meter. Assume the axis directions shown.

Animate

friction01c.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The forces on the box are shown. Try changing the parameters (mass of box, coefficient fo kinetic friction, applied force) to see how that affects the force vectors.

Animate

gravitation-01b.iwp

A satellite orbits the Earth in a circular orbit. The ratio of the radius of the satellite's orbit to the radius of the Earth is given. The red dot represents an apple falling near the surface of the Earth. The distance fallen is too small in scale compared to planetary distances to see in the animation. However, the acceleration is greater than that of the satellite. The vectors represent the accelerations of the objects.

Animate

friction01c.iwp

A red box slides down a wall. The forces on the box are shown. Try changing the parameters (mass of box, coefficient fo kinetic friction, applied force) to see how that affects the force vectors.

Animate

gravitation-01b.iwp

A satellite orbits the Earth in a circular orbit. The ratio of the radius of the satellite's orbit to the radius of the Earth is given. The red dot represents an apple falling near the surface of the Earth. The distance fallen is too small in scale compared to planetary distances to see in the animation. However, the acceleration is greater than that of the satellite. The vectors represent the accelerations of the objects.

Animate

gravitation-01e.iwp

Two satellites orbit Planet Q in circular orbits. The ratios of the orbital radii and of the masses of the satellites are given. The vectors represent the gravitational accelerations and orbital velocities of the satellites.

Animate

gravitation-01b.iwp

A satellite orbits the Earth in a circular orbit. The ratio of the radius of the satellite's orbit to the radius of the Earth is given. The red dot represents an apple falling near the surface of the Earth. The distance fallen is too small in scale compared to planetary distances to see in the animation. However, the acceleration is greater than that of the satellite. The vectors represent the accelerations of the objects.

Animate

gravitation-01e.iwp

Two satellites orbit Planet Q in circular orbits. The ratios of the orbital radii and of the masses of the satellites are given. The vectors represent the gravitational accelerations and orbital velocities of the satellites.

Animate

gravitation-02b.iwp

The space shuttle orbits the Earth. The ratio of the shuttle's orbital radius to the Earth is given. The view is looking down on a pole. The white line represents a meridian. Hence, it rotates at the same frequency as the Earth.

Animate

gravitation-01e.iwp

Two satellites orbit Planet Q in circular orbits. The ratios of the orbital radii and of the masses of the satellites are given. The vectors represent the gravitational accelerations and orbital velocities of the satellites.

Animate

gravitation-02b.iwp

The space shuttle orbits the Earth. The ratio of the shuttle's orbital radius to the Earth is given. The view is looking down on a pole. The white line represents a meridian. Hence, it rotates at the same frequency as the Earth.

Animate

gravitation-03.iwp

The green satellite orbits the Earth in a geostationary orbit. This means that the satellite orbits in the Earth's equatorial plane and always remains above the same point on the Earth. The rotation of the Earth is repesented by the white arrow, which points directly to the satellite. The elapsed time is given in both hours and seconds. The red satellite orbits the Earth in a typical space shuttle orbit. This orbit is very close to the Earth in comparison to that of the geosynchronous satellite. A readout of the number of shuttle orbits executed is given.

Animate

gravitation-02b.iwp

The space shuttle orbits the Earth. The ratio of the shuttle's orbital radius to the Earth is given. The view is looking down on a pole. The white line represents a meridian. Hence, it rotates at the same frequency as the Earth.

Animate

gravitation-03.iwp

The green satellite orbits the Earth in a geostationary orbit. This means that the satellite orbits in the Earth's equatorial plane and always remains above the same point on the Earth. The rotation of the Earth is repesented by the white arrow, which points directly to the satellite. The elapsed time is given in both hours and seconds. The red satellite orbits the Earth in a typical space shuttle orbit. This orbit is very close to the Earth in comparison to that of the geosynchronous satellite. A readout of the number of shuttle orbits executed is given.

Animate

incplane04.iwp

An object slides down a frictionless inclined plane. The plane makes an angle of theta with the horizontal.

Animate

gravitation-03.iwp

The green satellite orbits the Earth in a geostationary orbit. This means that the satellite orbits in the Earth's equatorial plane and always remains above the same point on the Earth. The rotation of the Earth is repesented by the white arrow, which points directly to the satellite. The elapsed time is given in both hours and seconds. The red satellite orbits the Earth in a typical space shuttle orbit. This orbit is very close to the Earth in comparison to that of the geosynchronous satellite. A readout of the number of shuttle orbits executed is given.

Animate

incplane04.iwp

An object slides down a frictionless inclined plane. The plane makes an angle of theta with the horizontal.

Animate

nsl-00.iwp

Two blocks initially rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. (The view is looking down on the surface.) At t = 0, an identical push is applied directly to each block. The push on each block remains constant as the blocks accelerate. Which block has more mass and why.

Animate

incplane04.iwp

An object slides down a frictionless inclined plane. The plane makes an angle of theta with the horizontal.

Animate

nsl-00.iwp

Two blocks initially rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. (The view is looking down on the surface.) At t = 0, an identical push is applied directly to each block. The push on each block remains constant as the blocks accelerate. Which block has more mass and why.

Animate

nsl-01.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the green block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

nsl-00.iwp

Two blocks initially rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. (The view is looking down on the surface.) At t = 0, an identical push is applied directly to each block. The push on each block remains constant as the blocks accelerate. Which block has more mass and why.

Animate

nsl-01.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the green block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

nsl-02.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the red block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

nsl-01.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the green block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

nsl-02.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the red block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

pendulum02.iwp

A pendulum is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For which positions (A, B, C) is the tangential acceleration 0? maximum? centripetal acceleration 0? maximum?

Animate

nsl-02.iwp

Two blocks rest next to each other on a frictionless surface. At t = 0, a push (by a hand for example) is applied directly to the red block. The push remains constant as the two blocks accelerate.

Animate

pendulum02.iwp

A pendulum is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For which positions (A, B, C) is the tangential acceleration 0? maximum? centripetal acceleration 0? maximum?

Animate

pendulum02b.iwp

A pendulum bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For the system of Earth and bob, match the energy bars with the energy terms that they represent.

Animate

pendulum02.iwp

A pendulum is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For which positions (A, B, C) is the tangential acceleration 0? maximum? centripetal acceleration 0? maximum?

Animate

pendulum02b.iwp

A pendulum bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For the system of Earth and bob, match the energy bars with the energy terms that they represent.

Animate

pendulum03.iwp

A pendulum is set up on the surface of Planet X. The bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. What is the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of Planet X?

Animate

pendulum02b.iwp

A pendulum bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. For the system of Earth and bob, match the energy bars with the energy terms that they represent.

Animate

pendulum03.iwp

A pendulum is set up on the surface of Planet X. The bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. What is the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of Planet X?

Animate

polarnet5.iwp

Blue line: Jumps alternately between two polar functions of the form: r = a + bcos(cit + d), where the coefficients a-d are selectable for each function. The angle increment, i, is also selectable. The value of t is automatically incremented in steps of 1 starting at t = 0. Red and green lines: Plots of the individual functions The coefficients are initially set for two circles.

Animate

pendulum03.iwp

A pendulum is set up on the surface of Planet X. The bob is released from rest and oscillates in a vertical plane. What is the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of Planet X?

Animate

polarnet5.iwp

Blue line: Jumps alternately between two polar functions of the form: r = a + bcos(cit + d), where the coefficients a-d are selectable for each function. The angle increment, i, is also selectable. The value of t is automatically incremented in steps of 1 starting at t = 0. Red and green lines: Plots of the individual functions The coefficients are initially set for two circles.

Animate

proj-vect-00.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from a cliff on an unkown planet. Velocity vectors are shown on the projectile. Use the velocity vectors at two instants of time to determine the acceleration of the object.

Animate

polarnet5.iwp

Blue line: Jumps alternately between two polar functions of the form: r = a + bcos(cit + d), where the coefficients a-d are selectable for each function. The angle increment, i, is also selectable. The value of t is automatically incremented in steps of 1 starting at t = 0. Red and green lines: Plots of the individual functions The coefficients are initially set for two circles.

Animate

proj-vect-00.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from a cliff on an unkown planet. Velocity vectors are shown on the projectile. Use the velocity vectors at two instants of time to determine the acceleration of the object.

Animate

projectile-compare-1.iwp

Three projectiles are launched with different initial velocities and reach the same maximum height. Denote the paths as follow: A: red B: green C: blue List the projectiles in order of a) increasing initial speed and b) time of flight.

Animate

proj-vect-00.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from a cliff on an unkown planet. Velocity vectors are shown on the projectile. Use the velocity vectors at two instants of time to determine the acceleration of the object.

Animate

projectile-compare-1.iwp

Three projectiles are launched with different initial velocities and reach the same maximum height. Denote the paths as follow: A: red B: green C: blue List the projectiles in order of a) increasing initial speed and b) time of flight.

Animate

projectile-problem-1.iwp

A red ball slides off a table. Ignoring friction, which animation correctly represents the path of the ball? Enter 1, 2, 3, or 4 to change animations. The horizontal and vertical positions, velocities, and accelerations of the ball are shown under Outputs.

Animate

projectile-compare-1.iwp

Three projectiles are launched with different initial velocities and reach the same maximum height. Denote the paths as follow: A: red B: green C: blue List the projectiles in order of a) increasing initial speed and b) time of flight.

Animate

projectile-problem-1.iwp

A red ball slides off a table. Ignoring friction, which animation correctly represents the path of the ball? Enter 1, 2, 3, or 4 to change animations. The horizontal and vertical positions, velocities, and accelerations of the ball are shown under Outputs.

Animate

projectile-problem-2.iwp

A bouncing ball is shown in the animation. What is the ratio of the vertical velocity of the ball just after it hits the ground to the vertical velocity of the ball just before it hits the ground?

Animate

projectile-problem-1.iwp

A red ball slides off a table. Ignoring friction, which animation correctly represents the path of the ball? Enter 1, 2, 3, or 4 to change animations. The horizontal and vertical positions, velocities, and accelerations of the ball are shown under Outputs.

Animate

projectile-problem-2.iwp

A bouncing ball is shown in the animation. What is the ratio of the vertical velocity of the ball just after it hits the ground to the vertical velocity of the ball just before it hits the ground?

Animate

projectile-problem-3.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from ground level. Determine the initial velocity of the projectile. The grid spacing is 2.0 m.

Animate

projectile-problem-2.iwp

A bouncing ball is shown in the animation. What is the ratio of the vertical velocity of the ball just after it hits the ground to the vertical velocity of the ball just before it hits the ground?

Animate

projectile-problem-3.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from ground level. Determine the initial velocity of the projectile. The grid spacing is 2.0 m.

Animate

pulley-plane-03.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. The forces on the blocks are shown. Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses and angle.

Animate

projectile-problem-3.iwp

A projectile is launched at an angle from ground level. Determine the initial velocity of the projectile. The grid spacing is 2.0 m.

Animate

pulley-plane-03.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. The forces on the blocks are shown. Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses and angle.

Animate

pulley-plane-04.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the table boundaries.

Animate

pulley-plane-03.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. The forces on the blocks are shown. Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses and angle.

Animate

pulley-plane-04.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the table boundaries.

Animate

pulley-plane-05.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? How must the masses compare in order for the system of the two blocks to be in equilibrium? Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses.

Animate

pulley-plane-04.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? Caution: Unphysical results will be obtained if blocks slide past the table boundaries.

Animate

pulley-plane-05.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? How must the masses compare in order for the system of the two blocks to be in equilibrium? Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses.

Animate

pulley-plane-05a.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system and the tension in the connecting string in terms of the masses, the angle of inclination, and g?

Animate

pulley-plane-05.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system? How must the masses compare in order for the system of the two blocks to be in equilibrium? Caution: Unphysical results may be obtained with certain combinations of masses.

Animate

pulley-plane-05a.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system and the tension in the connecting string in terms of the masses, the angle of inclination, and g?

Animate

pulse-compare-01.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the two pulses move in strings of the same linear density, how do the tensions in the strings compare?

Animate

pulley-plane-05a.iwp

Two blocks are connected by a massless, unstretchable string which passes over a frictionless, massless pulley. There is no friction between the red block and the plane. When the blue block is released, the system of the two blocks accelerates. What is the acceleration of the system and the tension in the connecting string in terms of the masses, the angle of inclination, and g?

Animate

pulse-compare-01.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the two pulses move in strings of the same linear density, how do the tensions in the strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-02.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the tension in the two strings is the same, how do the linear densities of the strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-01.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the two pulses move in strings of the same linear density, how do the tensions in the strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-02.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the tension in the two strings is the same, how do the linear densities of the strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-03.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the linear density of the upper string is twice that of the lower string, how do the tensions in the two strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-02.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the tension in the two strings is the same, how do the linear densities of the strings compare?

Animate

pulse-compare-03.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the linear density of the upper string is twice that of the lower string, how do the tensions in the two strings compare?

Animate

shm-phase-02b.iwp

The red and blue objects have the same mass and oscillate in SHM with the same period and amplitude. The only thing different is the phase. Click Show Graph to see position vs. time graphs of both objects. Determine what the phase of the blue object must be so that it starts at the same position and with the same velocity and acceleration as the red object. You can check your answer by inputing the value of phase that you calculate. Note that the phase is input in radians.

Animate

pulse-compare-03.iwp

The upper pane shows a pulse moving to the right on a string while the lower pane shows a pulse moving to the left. If the linear density of the upper string is twice that of the lower string, how do the tensions in the two strings compare?

Animate

shm-phase-02b.iwp

The red and blue objects have the same mass and oscillate in SHM with the same period and amplitude. The only thing different is the phase. Click Show Graph to see position vs. time graphs of both objects. Determine what the phase of the blue object must be so that it starts at the same position and with the same velocity and acceleration as the red object. You can check your answer by inputing the value of phase that you calculate. Note that the phase is input in radians.

Animate

spring-circle-analogy-02.iwp

A ball oscillates in simple harmonic motion about the origin, while a second ball moves at constant speed in a circular path. Both balls start at y = 0 and have the same initial velocity. The black vector represents the velocity of the red ball, and the orange vectors represent the total velocity and the x- and y-velocity components of the green ball. The speed of the green ball and the angle that its radius vector makes with the +x-axis are given under Outputs. At all times, the position and velocity of the red ball are equal to the y-components of the position and velocity of the green ball. It may be helpful to think of the motion of the red ball as the projection of the motion of the green ball onto the y-axis. This is what the gray shadow represents.

Animate

shm-phase-02b.iwp

The red and blue objects have the same mass and oscillate in SHM with the same period and amplitude. The only thing different is the phase. Click Show Graph to see position vs. time graphs of both objects. Determine what the phase of the blue object must be so that it starts at the same position and with the same velocity and acceleration as the red object. You can check your answer by inputing the value of phase that you calculate. Note that the phase is input in radians.

Animate

spring-circle-analogy-02.iwp

A ball oscillates in simple harmonic motion about the origin, while a second ball moves at constant speed in a circular path. Both balls start at y = 0 and have the same initial velocity. The black vector represents the velocity of the red ball, and the orange vectors represent the total velocity and the x- and y-velocity components of the green ball. The speed of the green ball and the angle that its radius vector makes with the +x-axis are given under Outputs. At all times, the position and velocity of the red ball are equal to the y-components of the position and velocity of the green ball. It may be helpful to think of the motion of the red ball as the projection of the motion of the green ball onto the y-axis. This is what the gray shadow represents.

Animate

spring-equation-02.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-circle-analogy-02.iwp

A ball oscillates in simple harmonic motion about the origin, while a second ball moves at constant speed in a circular path. Both balls start at y = 0 and have the same initial velocity. The black vector represents the velocity of the red ball, and the orange vectors represent the total velocity and the x- and y-velocity components of the green ball. The speed of the green ball and the angle that its radius vector makes with the +x-axis are given under Outputs. At all times, the position and velocity of the red ball are equal to the y-components of the position and velocity of the green ball. It may be helpful to think of the motion of the red ball as the projection of the motion of the green ball onto the y-axis. This is what the gray shadow represents.

Animate

spring-equation-02.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-03.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. The ball is initially moving. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-02.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-03.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. The ball is initially moving. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-04.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-03.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. The ball is initially moving. Write the equation of the ball's motion. The grid spacing is 0.01 m. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-equation-04.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-motion-4.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center, the direction of +x is to the right, and the grid spacing is 0.02 m. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The heights of the vertical bars shown below the table are proportional to the values of kinetic and elastic potential energy of the block-spring system.

Animate

spring-equation-04.iwp

A ball oscillates horizontally in simple harmonic motion on a frictionless surface. Click Show Graph to see graphs of position and velocity vs. time.

Animate

spring-motion-4.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center, the direction of +x is to the right, and the grid spacing is 0.02 m. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The heights of the vertical bars shown below the table are proportional to the values of kinetic and elastic potential energy of the block-spring system.

Animate

spring_work-03.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block, bringing it to a stop. Determine the spring constant of the spring. Caution: Unphysical results (such as the block passing through the wall) may be result from some combinations of initial velocity and mass. In such cases, one simply imagines that the spring and support extend further to the right. The block will always return, given enough time.

Animate

spring-motion-4.iwp

When you play the animation, the block oscillates horizontally about the origin on a frictionless table. The origin is in the center, the direction of +x is to the right, and the grid spacing is 0.02 m. The oscillation is the result of a Hooke's Law force applied by the spring to the block. The heights of the vertical bars shown below the table are proportional to the values of kinetic and elastic potential energy of the block-spring system.

Animate

spring_work-03.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block, bringing it to a stop. Determine the spring constant of the spring. Caution: Unphysical results (such as the block passing through the wall) may be result from some combinations of initial velocity and mass. In such cases, one simply imagines that the spring and support extend further to the right. The block will always return, given enough time.

Animate

spring_work-04.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block. A vector representing the spring force is shown as well as a graph of the spring force vs. position. The yellow area under the line is the work done by the spring force.

Animate

spring_work-03.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block, bringing it to a stop. Determine the spring constant of the spring. Caution: Unphysical results (such as the block passing through the wall) may be result from some combinations of initial velocity and mass. In such cases, one simply imagines that the spring and support extend further to the right. The block will always return, given enough time.

Animate

spring_work-04.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block. A vector representing the spring force is shown as well as a graph of the spring force vs. position. The yellow area under the line is the work done by the spring force.

Animate

stopblock01c.iwp

An object moving horizontally is slowed by a force of kinetic friction. Adjust the magnitude of the initial velocity so that the left side of the block stops at the left-hand edge of the screen.

Animate

spring_work-04.iwp

A block slides frictionlessly toward a relaxed spring. As the block compresses the spring, the spring does work on the block. A vector representing the spring force is shown as well as a graph of the spring force vs. position. The yellow area under the line is the work done by the spring force.

Animate

stopblock01c.iwp

An object moving horizontally is slowed by a force of kinetic friction. Adjust the magnitude of the initial velocity so that the left side of the block stops at the left-hand edge of the screen.

Animate

stopblock01f.iwp

An object moves horizontally on a surface at constant velocity under the action of the forces shown.

Animate

stopblock01c.iwp

An object moving horizontally is slowed by a force of kinetic friction. Adjust the magnitude of the initial velocity so that the left side of the block stops at the left-hand edge of the screen.

Animate

stopblock01f.iwp

An object moves horizontally on a surface at constant velocity under the action of the forces shown.

Animate

trav-wave-4.iwp

A vertical rod is attached to one end of a string and oscillated at a constant frequency. This produces a transverse wave that travels to the right along the string. The red dots represent selected mass elements of the string to show that the medium oscillates vertically even as the wave travels horizontally. Determine the amplitude, wavelength, frequency, and speed of the wave as well as the tension in the string. The linear density of the string is given as an output.

Animate

stopblock01f.iwp

An object moves horizontally on a surface at constant velocity under the action of the forces shown.

Animate

trav-wave-4.iwp

A vertical rod is attached to one end of a string and oscillated at a constant frequency. This produces a transverse wave that travels to the right along the string. The red dots represent selected mass elements of the string to show that the medium oscillates vertically even as the wave travels horizontally. Determine the amplitude, wavelength, frequency, and speed of the wave as well as the tension in the string. The linear density of the string is given as an output.

Animate

vector02.iwp

Each of the numbered diagrams shows three vectors. In each diagram, the blue vector is A, the red vector B, and the green vector C. For which diagrams do two of the vectors add to produce the third, and for which diagrams do the three vectors add to 0?

Animate

trav-wave-4.iwp

A vertical rod is attached to one end of a string and oscillated at a constant frequency. This produces a transverse wave that travels to the right along the string. The red dots represent selected mass elements of the string to show that the medium oscillates vertically even as the wave travels horizontally. Determine the amplitude, wavelength, frequency, and speed of the wave as well as the tension in the string. The linear density of the string is given as an output.

Animate

vector02.iwp

Each of the numbered diagrams shows three vectors. In each diagram, the blue vector is A, the red vector B, and the green vector C. For which diagrams do two of the vectors add to produce the third, and for which diagrams do the three vectors add to 0?

Animate

vector03.iwp

What are the components, magnitude, and direction of the sum of the 3 vectors shown?

Animate

vector02.iwp

Each of the numbered diagrams shows three vectors. In each diagram, the blue vector is A, the red vector B, and the green vector C. For which diagrams do two of the vectors add to produce the third, and for which diagrams do the three vectors add to 0?

Animate

vector03.iwp

What are the components, magnitude, and direction of the sum of the 3 vectors shown?

Animate

vector04.iwp

What are the components of the sum of the 2 vectors shown?

Animate

vector03.iwp

What are the components, magnitude, and direction of the sum of the 3 vectors shown?

Animate

vector04.iwp

What are the components of the sum of the 2 vectors shown?

Animate

velocity01b.iwp

Play the animation to show a position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object. The blue line remains tangent to the path of the object. Therefore, the slope of the blue line is the instantaneous velocity of the object. Its value is given above the play buttons. Predict how a graph of velocity vs. time will appear. Then click on Show Graph to display a velocity vs. time graph of the motion.

Animate

vector04.iwp

What are the components of the sum of the 2 vectors shown?

Animate

velocity01b.iwp

Play the animation to show a position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object. The blue line remains tangent to the path of the object. Therefore, the slope of the blue line is the instantaneous velocity of the object. Its value is given above the play buttons. Predict how a graph of velocity vs. time will appear. Then click on Show Graph to display a velocity vs. time graph of the motion.

Animate

velocity02b.iwp

The situation is similar to the last problem but with different initial values. Change the inputs in order to model the motion of an object thrown vertically from the ground (initial position of 0 m) at 25 m/s. (What should you input for the acceleration?). Type in values of initial position, initial velocity, and acceleration and run the animation. Remember to click Reset whenever you change an input. Click Show graph to show velocity vs. time and acceleration vs. time graphs.

Animate

velocity01b.iwp

Play the animation to show a position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object. The blue line remains tangent to the path of the object. Therefore, the slope of the blue line is the instantaneous velocity of the object. Its value is given above the play buttons. Predict how a graph of velocity vs. time will appear. Then click on Show Graph to display a velocity vs. time graph of the motion.

Animate

velocity02b.iwp

The situation is similar to the last problem but with different initial values. Change the inputs in order to model the motion of an object thrown vertically from the ground (initial position of 0 m) at 25 m/s. (What should you input for the acceleration?). Type in values of initial position, initial velocity, and acceleration and run the animation. Remember to click Reset whenever you change an input. Click Show graph to show velocity vs. time and acceleration vs. time graphs.

Animate

velocity04.iwp

A position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object is shown. The blue line is always tangent to the path of the object. Determine the acceleration of the object by first finding the velocities at two instants of time. (Note that for this problem the graph display has been disabled.)

Animate

velocity02b.iwp

The situation is similar to the last problem but with different initial values. Change the inputs in order to model the motion of an object thrown vertically from the ground (initial position of 0 m) at 25 m/s. (What should you input for the acceleration?). Type in values of initial position, initial velocity, and acceleration and run the animation. Remember to click Reset whenever you change an input. Click Show graph to show velocity vs. time and acceleration vs. time graphs.

Animate

velocity04.iwp

A position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object is shown. The blue line is always tangent to the path of the object. Determine the acceleration of the object by first finding the velocities at two instants of time. (Note that for this problem the graph display has been disabled.)

Animate

velocity06.iwp

Play the animation to show a position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object. Determine the acceleration of the object.

Animate

velocity04.iwp

A position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object is shown. The blue line is always tangent to the path of the object. Determine the acceleration of the object by first finding the velocities at two instants of time. (Note that for this problem the graph display has been disabled.)

Animate

velocity06.iwp

Play the animation to show a position vs. time graph of a uniformly-accelerating object. Determine the acceleration of the object.