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Browsing Animations: Optics, Physical

7 Animations


Animate

2-source-inter.iwp

This applet draws wavefront diagrams of waves from two sources.

Animate

air-wedge-1.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. Play the animation to advance the position of the incident ray by the given increment. The phase difference is given as an output in units of wavelengths. All distance units are in micrometers (10^-6 m). 1. Change the height of the post to 0. Play the animation while watching the phase difference. Explain why the phase difference is always half a wavelength. 2. Now change the height of the post back to 50 µm. Determine the wavelength of the incident light to the nearest nanometer (0.001 µm). In order to precisely position the incident ray, change the angle of incidence to 0°. Then select an initial position near the one you're looking for and change the position increment to a small value.

Animate

air-wedge-3.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray by the given increment. The phase difference is given as an output in units of wavelengths. All distance units are in micrometers (10^-6 m). In order to precisely position the incident ray, select an initial position near the one you're looking for. Then select a small position increment. Setting the incident angle to 0 degrees is also recommended. Determine the height of the post to the nearest 0.1 µm. Explain how you found your answer.

Animate

air-wedge-1.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. Play the animation to advance the position of the incident ray by the given increment. The phase difference is given as an output in units of wavelengths. All distance units are in micrometers (10^-6 m). 1. Change the height of the post to 0. Play the animation while watching the phase difference. Explain why the phase difference is always half a wavelength. 2. Now change the height of the post back to 50 µm. Determine the wavelength of the incident light to the nearest nanometer (0.001 µm). In order to precisely position the incident ray, change the angle of incidence to 0°. Then select an initial position near the one you're looking for and change the position increment to a small value.

Animate

air-wedge-3.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray by the given increment. The phase difference is given as an output in units of wavelengths. All distance units are in micrometers (10^-6 m). In order to precisely position the incident ray, select an initial position near the one you're looking for. Then select a small position increment. Setting the incident angle to 0 degrees is also recommended. Determine the height of the post to the nearest 0.1 µm. Explain how you found your answer.

Animate

air-wedge-template.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. The angle of the wedge may be changed by changing the height of the triangular post. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray in the given increments. The phase difference is given as an output in multiples of wavelengths. Refraction of the rays in the glass plates is not shown. All distance units are micrometers.

Animate

air-wedge-3.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray by the given increment. The phase difference is given as an output in units of wavelengths. All distance units are in micrometers (10^-6 m). In order to precisely position the incident ray, select an initial position near the one you're looking for. Then select a small position increment. Setting the incident angle to 0 degrees is also recommended. Determine the height of the post to the nearest 0.1 µm. Explain how you found your answer.

Animate

air-wedge-template.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. The angle of the wedge may be changed by changing the height of the triangular post. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray in the given increments. The phase difference is given as an output in multiples of wavelengths. Refraction of the rays in the glass plates is not shown. All distance units are micrometers.

Animate

double-slit-1.iwp

Two sources of monochromatic waves are situated on either side of the origin. The sources oscillate in phase. The pattern of interference fringes is projected on a screen near the top of the display. Playing the animation will decrease the source separation and show the resulting change in the interference pattern. Actual fringes would have intensity variations that can't be displayed in the animation.

Animate

air-wedge-template.iwp

Monochromatic light is incident on an air wedge. The angle of the wedge may be changed by changing the height of the triangular post. Playing the animation advances the position of the incident ray in the given increments. The phase difference is given as an output in multiples of wavelengths. Refraction of the rays in the glass plates is not shown. All distance units are micrometers.

Animate

double-slit-1.iwp

Two sources of monochromatic waves are situated on either side of the origin. The sources oscillate in phase. The pattern of interference fringes is projected on a screen near the top of the display. Playing the animation will decrease the source separation and show the resulting change in the interference pattern. Actual fringes would have intensity variations that can't be displayed in the animation.

Animate

thin-film-1.iwp

A ray of light is incident from air (blue) on a thin film (yellow). The film is deposited on a transparent medium (gray). Light is reflected from the upper and lower surfaces of the film. The reflected rays interfere. (Grid units are 100 nm.) The phase difference between the reflected rays is given in units of wavelengths. Playing the animation will increase the wavelength by the selected increment. The default values for wavelength and increment will advance the wavelengths through the range of visible light. 1. Rank the media in order of increasing index of refraction. What evidence do you have for your choice? 2. Based on your rankings, which of the reflected rays, if either, undergo phase reversal on reflection? 3. Determine to the nearest nanometer the wavelength of visible light, if any, that undergoes complete constructive interference for the given film thickness an an angle of incidence of 0°. Explain your choice. 4. Determine to the nearest nanometer the wavelength of visible light, if any, that undergoes complete destructive interference for the given film thickness and an angle of incidence of 0°. Explain your choice.

Animate

double-slit-1.iwp

Two sources of monochromatic waves are situated on either side of the origin. The sources oscillate in phase. The pattern of interference fringes is projected on a screen near the top of the display. Playing the animation will decrease the source separation and show the resulting change in the interference pattern. Actual fringes would have intensity variations that can't be displayed in the animation.

Animate

thin-film-1.iwp

A ray of light is incident from air (blue) on a thin film (yellow). The film is deposited on a transparent medium (gray). Light is reflected from the upper and lower surfaces of the film. The reflected rays interfere. (Grid units are 100 nm.) The phase difference between the reflected rays is given in units of wavelengths. Playing the animation will increase the wavelength by the selected increment. The default values for wavelength and increment will advance the wavelengths through the range of visible light. 1. Rank the media in order of increasing index of refraction. What evidence do you have for your choice? 2. Based on your rankings, which of the reflected rays, if either, undergo phase reversal on reflection? 3. Determine to the nearest nanometer the wavelength of visible light, if any, that undergoes complete constructive interference for the given film thickness an an angle of incidence of 0°. Explain your choice. 4. Determine to the nearest nanometer the wavelength of visible light, if any, that undergoes complete destructive interference for the given film thickness and an angle of incidence of 0°. Explain your choice.

Animate

thin-film-2.iwp

A ray of light is incident from air on a thin soap film (yellow). The medium below the film is also air. Light is reflected from the upper and lower surfaces of the film. The reflected rays interfere. (Grid units are 100 nm.) The phase difference between the reflected rays is given in units of wavelengths. Playing the animation will increase the film thickness by the indicated increment. 1. For the given initial values and an angle of incidence of 0°, verify that that the phase difference is correct. 2. Determine to the nearest nanometer the film thickness for which the reflected rays undergo complete destructive interference at an angle of incidence of 0°.